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The IIS admin service will not start on your Windows 2003 Server or your Metabase has become corrupted

The IIS admin service will not start on your Windows 2003 Server or your Metabase has become corrupted.

By default, the Metabase History feature is turned on in IIS 6.0. The Metabase History feature automatically tracks changes to the metabase that are written to disk. When the metabase is written to disk (or any time it is opened and closed), IIS marks the new Metabase.xml file with a version number (like MetaBase_0000000000_0000000000.xml and MBSchema_0000000000_0000000000.xml) and saves a copy of the file in the history folder.
 
Each history file is marked with a unique version number (_0000000000_0000000000.xml  in this example), which is then available for the metabase rollback or restore processes. A pair of history files is made up of a MetaBase.xml and a MBSchema.xml file
named with the same major and minor version number, and stored in the history folder. These copies can be viewed only by users who are members of the Administrators group. You can find the history folder in the following location:

 

C:\WINDOWS\system32\inetsrv\History

 

You can roll back the metabase from the history files. To do this, follow these steps:

 

1.

In IIS Manager, click the Computer icon under Internet Information Services.

2.

On the Action menu, point to All Tasks, and then click Backup/Restore Configuration.

3.

Under Previous backups, click one of the Automatic Backup files in the list, and then click Restore.

 

If this method does not work, or you do not see the machine name in the IIS Manager, you can go in to the C:\WINDOWS\system32\inetsrv\History and find the most recent version of each file, rename them Metabase.xml and MBSchema.xml, and then copy and paste them into the C:\WINDOWS\system32\inetsrv folder, they will replace the older files (you should say yes to both prompts concerning replacing files with the new ones) and you should be able to open IIS and see your web and ftp sites.

Article ID: 560, Created On: 11/26/2007, Modified: 6/2/2009

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